Oct 25, 2015

Gulf of Maine’s cold-craving marine species forced to retreat to deeper waters

Maine
USA
by
Colin Woodard
,
Press Herald
Swollen from recent rains, the Penobscot River flows through the area of the river where the Veazie Dam once stood. The dam, along with the Great Works Dam farther downstream, was removed two years ago in an effort to allow salmon easier passage to spawning grounds upriver from the dam. Photo: Gregory Rec, Staff Photographer
Swollen from recent rains, the Penobscot River flows through the area of the river where the Veazie Dam once stood. The dam, along with the Great Works Dam farther downstream, was removed two years ago in an effort to allow salmon easier passage to spawning grounds upriver from the dam. Photo: Gregory Rec, Staff Photographer

The Gulf of Maine...has been warming rapidly as the deep-water currents that feed it have shifted...As a result, many native species – boreal and subarctic creatures at the southern edges of their ranges – are in retreat...“We’re really in the crosshairs of climate change right now,” says Andy Pershing, chief scientific officer at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute in Portland, who first revealed the alarming pace of the gulf’s recent warming.