Jul 5, 2018

Red-hot planet: All-time heat records have been set all over the world during the past week

Montreal, QC
Canada
by
Jason Samenow
,
Washington Post
Simulation of maximum temperatures on July 3 from American (GFS) weather model at two meters above the ground. Image: University of Maine Climate Reanalyzer
Simulation of maximum temperatures on July 3 from American (GFS) weather model at two meters above the ground. Image: University of Maine Climate Reanalyzer

From the normally mild summer climes of Ireland, Scotland and Canada to the scorching Middle East, numerous locations in the Northern Hemisphere have witnessed their hottest weather ever recorded over the past week.

Large areas of heat pressure or heat domes scattered around the hemisphere led to the sweltering temperatures. In Canada, CNN reports the heat is to blame for at least 17 death, mostly in and near Montreal, which endured record high temperatures.

In Northern Siberia, along the coast of the Arctic Ocean – where weather observations are scarce – model analyses showed temperatures soaring 40 degrees above normal on July 5, to over 90 degrees.

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No single record, in isolation, can be attributed to global warming. But collectively, these heat records are consistent with the kind of extremes we expect to see increase in a warming world.

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North America

  • A massive and intense heat dome has consumed the eastern two-thirds of the United States and southeast Canada since late last week. It’s not only been hot but also exceptionally humid. Here are some of the notable all-time records set:
  • Denver tied its all-time high-temperature record of 105 degrees on June 28.
  • Mount Washington, N.H., tied its all-time warmest low temperature of 60 degrees on July 2.
  • Burlington, Vt., set its all-time warmest low temperature ever recorded of 80 degrees on July 2.
  • Montreal recorded its highest temperature in recorded history, dating back 147 years, of 97.9 degrees (36.6 Celsius) on July 2. The city also posted its most extreme midnight combination of heat and humidity.
  • Ottawa posted its most extreme combination of heat and humidity on July 1.