Feb 9, 2017

So Long, La Niña; Arctic Temperatures Soar 63°F in 24 Hours

Kap Morris Jesup
Greenland
by
Jeff Masters
,
Category 6
Satellite image of massive Atlantic storm. Image: National Weather Service Ocean Prediction Center
Satellite image of massive Atlantic storm. Image: National Weather Service Ocean Prediction Center

The temperature at the northernmost land station in the world, Kap Morris Jesup, located on the northern coast of Greenland at 83.65°N latitude, soared to a remarkable 35°F (1.5°C) on Wednesday—beating the previous day’s high of -22°F by a shocking 57°, and marking a temperature more typical of June at this frigid location. The mercury skyrocketed an astonishing 63°F (34.8°C) in just 24 hours, from -29°F at 15 UTC February 7 to 33°F at 15 UTC February 8. As summarized by Jason Samenow of the Capital Weather Gang on February 6, the incredible warmth in the Arctic is due to a massive hurricane-force North Atlantic storm that bottomed out on Monday with a central pressure of 932 mb—a common reading in Category 4 hurricanes, and one of lowest pressures ever measured in a storm in this region.