Nov 20, 2015

September was hot enough to raise the bar for global temperatures – then along came October

by
Peter Hannam
,
The Sydney Morning Herald
Children cool off under a fountain in Madrid in July this year. Photo: Pablo Blazquez Dominguez
Children cool off under a fountain in Madrid in July this year. Photo: Pablo Blazquez Dominguez

[The] World Meteorological Organisation [is] expected to announce 2015 as the hottest year on record, even with a full month to run...One reason meteorologists were confident that 2015 will be the hottest year was that seven of the first nine months set heat records for land and sea-surface temperatures. But then along came October...[It] was the size of the anomaly – up 0.98 degrees compared with the 20th century October average – that was most notable. Planet-scale records are hard to break, and advances are typically measured in just 0.01-degree steps. This one was seven times larger.