Jun 2, 2016

Deep water in the heart of Texas

Parker County, TX
San Antonio, TX
Lubbock, TX
USA
by
Jeff Masters and Bob Henson
,
Weather Underground
An aerial view of homes in the Horseshoe Bend area on the banks of the Brazos River in north central Texas on Wednesday, June 1, 2016. Residents of some rural southeast Texas counties braced for more flooding along the river that is expected to crest at a record level just two years after it had run dry in places because of drought. Photo: Brandon Wade, Star-Telegram via AP
An aerial view of homes in the Horseshoe Bend area on the banks of the Brazos River in north central Texas on Wednesday, June 1, 2016. Residents of some rural southeast Texas counties braced for more flooding along the river that is expected to crest at a record level just two years after it had run dry in places because of drought. Photo: Brandon Wade, Star-Telegram via AP

Heavy rains continue to plague much of the Southern Plains, thanks to a weak, slow-moving upper-level low parked over west Texas and a persistent feed of very rich tropical air into the region from the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico...

After the Brazos River west of Houston hit a record crest on Monday (with levels reaching a new peak on Thursday), the river overflowed more than 200 miles to the northwest, in Parker County west of Fort Worth, overnight Tuesday night...

On Wednesday afternoon, flash floods pounded the Lubbock area as an estimated 3” to 5” of rain fell over parts of the city in a two-hour period. Overnight on Wednesday night, a mesoscale convective system (MCSs) formed over central Texas. After dumping more than 4” over parts of the San Antonio area, this MCS was drifting north on Thursday morning, while new showers and storms were developing to its east in the Houston area