Jan 26, 2016

Zika: how the virus's ability to spread in the US is remarkably easy

El Salvador
Brazil
by
Amber Jamieson
,
The Guardian
A health worker stands in the Sambadrome as he sprays insecticide to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that transmit the Zika virus, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Photo: Leo Correa, AP
A health worker stands in the Sambadrome as he sprays insecticide to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that transmit the Zika virus, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Photo: Leo Correa, AP

"Warmer conditions can make the population grow more rapidly,“ said [Dr Barry Alto, from the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory at the University of Florida], who ran tests on the Asian tiger mosquito in different temperatures and found that larvae in warmer conditions could reach maturity in just five to seven days, meaning it can breed more quickly