Apr 8, 2016

Climate-driven polar motion: 2003–2015

by
Surendra Adhikari and Erik R. Ivins
,
Science Advances
  • States Earth’s spin axis has been wandering along the Greenwich meridian since about 2000, representing a 75° eastward shift from its long-term drift direction
  • States the past 115 years have seen unequivocal evidence for a quasi-decadal periodicity, and these motions persist throughout the recent record of pole position, in spite of the new drift direction 
  • Analyzes space geodetic and satellite gravimetric data for the period 2003–2015 to show that all of the main features of polar motion are explained by global-scale continent-ocean mass transport
  • Finds the changes in terrestrial water storage (TWS) and global cryosphere together explain nearly the entire amplitude (83 ± 23%) and mean directional shift (within 5.9° ± 7.6°) of the observed motion
  • Finds that the TWS variability fully explains the decadal-like changes in polar motion observed during the study period, thus offering a clue to resolving the long-standing quest for determining the origins of decadal oscillations
  • States this newly discovered link between polar motion and global-scale TWS variability has broad implications for the study of past and future climate