Feb 5, 2018

Permafrost Stores a Globally Significant Amount of Mercury

by
Schuster, Paul F., Schaefer, Kevin M., Aiken, George R. et al
,
Geophysical Research Letters
  • States that changing climate in northern regions is causing permafrost to thaw with major implications for the global mercury (Hg) cycle
  • Estimates Hg in permafrost regions based on in situ measurements of sediment total mercury (STHg), soil organic carbon (SOC), and the Hg to carbon ratio (RHgC) combined with maps of soil carbon
  • Measures a median STHg of 43 ± 30 ng Hg g soil−1 and a median RHgC of 1.6 ± 0.9 μg Hg g C−1, consistent with published results of STHg for tundra soils and 11,000 measurements from 4,926 temperate, nonpermafrost sites in North America and Eurasia
  • Estimates that the Northern Hemisphere permafrost regions contain 1,656 ± 962 Gg Hg, of which 793 ± 461 Gg Hg is frozen in permafrost
  • Results show that permafrost soils store nearly twice as much Hg as all other soils, the ocean, and the atmosphere combined, and this Hg is vulnerable to release as permafrost thaws over the next century
  • Concludes that existing estimates greatly underestimate Hg in permafrost soils, indicating a need to reevaluate the role of the Arctic regions in the global Hg cycle