Nov 7, 2016

Floods kill 15 in Vietnam, thousands evacuated

Phú Yên Province
Vietnam
by
Mai Nguyen
,
Reuters

One of the clearest changes in weather globally is the increasing frequency of heavy rain.[1][2] As the global average temperature increases, so too does the ability of the atmosphere to hold and dump more water when it rains.[3] The average moisture content of the atmosphere has increased by about 4 percent since the 1970s, as expected from the Clausius–Clapeyron law, and storms reach out and gather water vapor over regions that are 10-25 times as large as the precipitation area, thus multiplying the effect of increased atmospheric moisture.[3][4]

Floods in Vietnam's central, central highland and southern provinces have left 15 people dead and six missing and displaced thousands, the Department of Natural Disaster Prevention and Control said on Monday.

Flooding from very heavy rain brought by cold air and a tropical low pressure system last week have blocked roads, destroyed more than 200 houses and inundated more than 40,000 other houses in 12 provinces, the department said in a report.

A combined 12,000 hectare of crop land were flooded while more than 40,000 cattle and poultry were dead or washed away, the report said.

Last month, floods following torrential rain killed dozens of people in Vietnam's central region of Ha Tinh and Quang Binh provinces and inundated more than 100,000 houses.