The Aggie Creek fire burns along the Trans-Alaska Pipeline in June. Photo: USDA/ flickr
Last updated December 4, 2018
May 1, 2015
-
Aug 15, 2015

Alaska Wildfire Season 2015

Alaska
USA

The 2015 Alaska fire season burned the second largest number of acres since records began in 1940. A 2016 climate attribution study finds that human-induced climate change "may have increased the risk of a fire season of this severity by 34 to 60 percent."

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Climate change may have elevated risk of an Alaska wildfire season this severe

Human-induced climate change may have increased the risk of an Alaska wildfire season of this severity by 34 to 60 percent, according to the fifth edition of "Explaining Extreme Events from a Climate Perspective" by the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.[1]