Dec 24, 2015

December Heat Tricks Flowers Into Putting On Spring Display

New York, NY
USA
by
Nicholas St. Fleur
,
New York Times
A Viburnum x bodnantense "Dawn" flower at the New York Botanical Garden. An official at the garden said the blooming in December was unusual. Credit Yana Paskova for The New York Times
A Viburnum x bodnantense "Dawn" flower at the New York Botanical Garden. An official at the garden said the blooming in December was unusual. Credit Yana Paskova for The New York Times

Across the region, this uncharacteristically warm winter has flower beds springing to life. Daffodil bulbs in suburban gardens are sending up tender green periscopes. And in city parks, roses are showing their plumage against Christmas tree backdrops. It is not normal. And while the plants will probably not be harmed in the long run, it may mean a less vivid floral parade in the spring. “When you smell something that smells like spring now, that’s a little bit unexpected,” said Brian Sullivan, the botanical garden’s vice president for gardens, landscape and outdoor collections. “It’s unusual to smell the fragrance of a viburnum in December.” Mr. Sullivan said the out-of-season blossoms fit into two categories: fall flowers that are having an extended blooming period, and spring flowers that are opening up too early.