Jan 2, 2020

Indonesia seeds clouds to keep them away from flooded capital

Jakarta, Indonesia
by
Bernadette Christina and Jessica Damiana
,
Reuters
Indonesia flooding extreme rain
A girl looks out between two tarps at a temporary shelter after floods in Jakarta, Indonesia. Credit: REUTERS/Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana

Signals Summary: Climate change is making extreme rainfall more common by increasing ocean evaporation and the amount of moisture the atmosphere can hold. 


Article Excerpt: Indonesia’s air force seeded clouds with salt on Friday to try to stop rainfall reaching the slowing sinking capital after deadly flash floods and landslides triggered by some of the heaviest rain ever recorded.

The death toll in Jakarta and surrounding areas rose to 43 as of Friday, the disaster mitigation agency said, while tens of thousands of people have been displaced.

...

The floods followed torrential rains on Dec. 31 and into the early hours of New Year’s Day that inundated swathes of Jakarta and nearby towns, home to about 30 million people.

The deluge at the start of 2020 was “one of the most extreme rainfall” events since records began in 1866, the Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysics Agency (BMKG) said on Friday.

The agency said climate change had increased the risk of extreme weather and warned that heavy rainfall could last until mid-February, with Jan 11-15 an expected peak.